Woman Loses Hands, Feet To Bogus Plastic Surgery

10 security start-ups to watch | ITworld

Brown underwent 27 surgeries to deal with the infection. “My hands popped out with this pink nail polish, and I’m like, oh my god, I’m going to lose my hands. I’m going lose my hands,” she said. Brown also lost her feet. She is not the only one who has been marred by fake silicone implants. “This is the close up of her right cheek, that shows these swollen, red angry nodules,” said Dr.
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YIKES! Here’s why you should never do your own plastic surgery (VIDEO) | Q13 FOX News

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He says he is seeing a disturbing trend of patients turning to plastic surgeons such as him after getting botched facial filler injections. The injections are used to smooth out facial lines. Some of the patients Glogau sees have traveled out of country and had these cosmetic procedures done cheaply. Others are purchasing cosmetic fillers from websites and self-injecting these dermal fillers into their faces. Often times, the patients have no idea whats in the dermal filler nor do they receive the procedure from a licensed medical professional.
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Apryl Brown lost her hands and feet to a staph infection after a discount plastic surgery procedure. (Source: CNN)

In this round-up of some of the newer security firms, Distil Networks, Observable Networks and Vectra Networks fit into that category. But two others just out of the gate, Exabeam and Fortscale, are part of another trend–squeezing more out of existing log management and security information and event management products. And then there’s Denver-based ProtectWise, founded by former McAfee veterans, which is still in stealth mode and only vaguely alluding to cloud-based security as a future offering. But investors are pouring money into it. ProtectWise has snagged over $17 million in venture-capital funding.
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